Things to Do in Martha's Vineyard

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Haunted Martha’s Vineyard Buildings & Martha’s Vineyard Ghost Tours

BY VINEYARD SQUARE HOTEL | 22 September 2015

When your town’s oldest building dates to 1672, you almost expect a supernatural presence around every corner. Martha’s Vineyard’s history, along with its fair share of strange occurrences, makes it a major hub for ghost hunters and local storytellers alike. Whether you’re fully in touch with the spirit world or you’re a little skeptical, these haunted Martha’s Vineyard locations make for a fun and spooky Halloween adventure. Happy ghost hunting!

 

Haunted Martha's Vineyard Building

 

Haunted Buildings in Edgartown

The Vineyard Gazette Building

Though the ghosts haven’t made headlines, some say this beloved island establishment is haunted. According to the Gazette, the building dates to the 1760s — its builder would go on to serve in the Revolutionary War. Rumor has it that the building served as an almshouse more than a century before the newspaper moved in, and that a fight between two men over a lover turned deadly there. If you’re hoping to connect with these spirits, the Gazette offers building tours year-round. For us, seeing the in-house offset press in action is an even bigger highlight.

 

59 N. Water Street – Former Daggett House Inn

Barely a block from Vineyard Square, the former Daggett House Inn is now a private residence. When it was an inn, this 18th-century building featured a secret room adjacent to the dining area. Those familiar with Martha’s Vineyard ghosts say you can still feel the presence of two brothers and their dog even walking by.

 

Haunted Martha's Vineyard House - The Vincent House
Photo: MV Preservation Society
The Vincent House

The island’s oldest residence is owned by the Martha’s Vineyard Preservation Trust, whose mission to preserve historic properties doubles as a pretty solid perk for local ghosts. The Vincent House is furnished with artifacts from four centuries of island life, making it a fun and interactive stop on your Martha’s Vineyard ghost tour — if you dare.

 

Oak Bluffs Ghosts

Corbin-Norton House – Ocean Park

This house has burned down twice—first in 1894 then again in 2002—and ghost hunter extraordinaire Holly Nadler says it’s no coincidence. Sisters Julie and Loulou Danzell were behind the well-documented string of 1894 Oak Bluffs arsons, and their spirits still linger on the island. For more of the ghostly details, check out the Gazette’s account of these mysterious events.

 

Martha’s Vineyard Ghosts in Aquinnah

The Vanderhoop Homestead

Widely considered Martha’s Vineyard’s most-haunted house, the Vanderhoop Homestead is now the Aquinnah Cultural Center. Spirit hunters identify its ghost as a little girl screaming at night, but former residents of the house say they’ve never heard her.

 

Vineyard Haven

Renear House

The Vineyard Gazette notes that some people have reported hearing doors and windows slam in empty rooms at the Renear house on Church Street in Vineyard Haven, though the house’s owner denies any spiritual presence.

 

Here at Vineyard Square?

Formerly the Colonial Inn, our building has been at the center of Edgartown happenings since 1911. We can’t say for sure whether we have ghosts, but one former manager did report a spooky hotel experience a few years back. If you’re into ghost hunting, you wouldn’t be the first to check in to our Edgartown hotel with Ouija board and EMF sensor in tow.


October 20, 2018 04:33 pm

I love Martha's Vineyard including all its rich history and unexplainable happenings.


May 23, 2018 02:28 pm

My great, great grandmother was Almira Daggett and a direct descendent of Joseph Daggett. Interesting that there may be a ghost or two in that now residence. I wonder if they bother the owners. I thought it was very sad that the Daggett House did not remain an Inn or a least be made into a museum.